Elm Sapling Gallery, page 2

An appendix to Saving the American Elm by Bruce Carley -- Updated November 26, 2010

The photographs on this page show young Valley Forge elms (and one New Harmony) at various stages of their early growth. These photographs were taken at various times by my brother, Todd Carley, a professional photographer. Todd's elm photographs may be distributed freely or re-published for wholesome purposes; in return, a credit link ("courtesy elmpost.org") is always appreciated. Most of these photographs also are available in print resolution, and anyone interested is invited to contact Todd for more information. Additional elm photographs can be found in my Elm Sapling Gallery (page 1) and in my Gallery of Mature Elms.

Legacy of the Bristol Elms: Previously this page had been used to call attention exclusively to some elm plantings in Bristol, Rhode Island which had been photographed in 2004; however, since that time those particular trees have suffered badly from neglect, despite my repeated warnings about the necessary pruning. Most of the Bristol specimens have split beyond salvation and no longer exist, which is exactly what people can expect when they leave the Valley Forge elm entirely to its own devices in its earliest years. The other elm saplings in these gallery pages, with few exceptions, have been treated properly over the years and have done much better, so I would like to think that the legacy of the Bristol fiasco will be the positive impact of this warning, preventing similar losses elsewhere. The Valley Forge elm is easy enough to raise, but it definitely does not lend itself to being forgotten or pruned incorrectly at this early stage of its life - a fact which cannot be overstated. Detailed guidelines on working with these trees are always available at www.elmpost.org, so please take them seriously if you are growing this variety.

Click any picture to view the full-size version.

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Valley Forge elms located at the Acton Arboretum, Acton, MA. Ages in years from left to right: 5, 6, 7, 7.
The first three photographs from the left are the same tree. Photographs by Todd Carley.






Valley Forge elms. The tree on the far left is at the Acton Arboretum, Acton, MA; the others are at Grassy Pond Conservation
Area, Acton, MA and are all the same tree. Ages in years from left to right: 6, 4, 5, 5. Photographs by Todd Carley.






Valley Forge elms. The tree on the far left is located at the Acton Arboretum, Acton, MA; the other photographs depict the
remarkable tree at Meeting House Hill in Acton, MA which in years to come would contract DED and then recover fully,
entirely on its own. Ages in years from left to right: 5, 3, 4, 4. Photographs by Todd Carley.






Valley Forge elms. The far left photo depicts 2-year-old whips in the nursery. The center-left sapling is a 3-year-old on
private property. The two on the right, 4 and 5 years old, are at NARA Park, Acton, MA. Photographs by Todd Carley.






The three photographs on the left depict 6-year-old Valley Forge elm saplings at NARA Park, Acton, MA. The tree
on the far right is a New Harmony elm, probably about 10 years old, located on private property in Littleton, MA.
Photographs by Todd Carley.






The two photographs on the left show the Valley Forge elm at the Burnside Building, the town hall of Bristol, RI.
This tree was a fine specimen in 2004, and its avoidable demise in 2007 disgusted me. The two photographs
on the right depict a Valley Forge elm on Bristol's town common. Photographs by Todd Carley.






The photograph on the far left shows a Valley Forge elm in a cemetery in Bristol, RI. The two center photos depict a Valley
Forge elm at the Colt School in Bristol. The photo on the far right is a Valley Forge elm at the Andrews School in Bristol.
Because of prolonged neglect, these trees are now dead or disfigured. No one can ever say I didn't warn them.
Photographs by Todd Carley.






The photograph on the far left shows a Valley Forge elm at the Andrews School in Bristol, RI. The two center photographs
show a Valley Forge elm along Franklin Street in Bristol. The tree on the far right is a Valley Forge elm in one of
Bristol's meadows. Photographs by Todd Carley.





The photograph on the left shows a Valley Forge elm in a meadow in Bristol, RI. The other two photographs show
a Valley Forge elm at the North Burial Ground in Bristol. Photographs by Todd Carley.





The left and center photographs depict a Valley Forge elm at the North Burial Ground in Bristol, RI. The photograph on the
right shows a group of young elms, mostly Valley Forge, in a special nursery in Bristol which regrettably was destined
to be completely abandoned, to the detriment of all the trees. Photographs by Todd Carley.



Elm Sapling Gallery       Gallery of Mature Elms

Main article: Saving the American Elm